Email Marketing: It’s ALIVE.

Email marketing is not dead.

In fact, it continues to grow.  There were an estimated 3.3 billion email accounts in use in 2011, and that number is expected to be 4 billion in 2015. Email marketing is estimated to bring in $12 billion by 2016 , at a time when 192 billion emails (including all kinds of emails outside of marketing emails) will be sent.  With the number of email accounts increasing, it makes sense that the return on investment (ROI) for email marketing has increased as well.

Companies make about $44.25 for every $1 spent on email marketing. Yet, 85 percent of people who responded to a survey by Emailvision said that they do not believe that they are fully leveraging email data. Wow. This means that not only is the ROI about $45 per every dollar, but it means that this number could be much higher if email data was fully leveraged.

Marketing communication professionals are able to keep email alive and moving through saturated media channels by offering exclusive products, discounts, and other offers that can only be reaped through providing an email address. Another way to keep email marketing alive, is to promote is through social media.

According to ConstantContact, small business that combined email marketing with their social media campaigns saw in increase in email list growth and higher click-through rates than those using email alone. With social media providing an additional 10 million impressions, it is easy to see that promoting email marketing on social media has a great ROI and can only help to increase the ROI for email marketing.

It is important to keep email marketing involved in an integrated marketing communication plan because it is a great hub for tying together all forms of marketing. Emails can provide a direct message and consistent branding. An email can also be considered one of seven important touches that are needed for a consumer to receive a message.

Additionally, it is a great way to leverage push and pull marketing. Soliciting email addresses then incorporates direct email communication, and may then translate these email recipients into loyal social media patrons as well through the use of social sharing buttons. According to the below infographic from EROI.COM, 66 percent of companies leverage their email marketing through social media, primarily Facebook and Twitter.

One of my favorite companies is BCBG. I receive the company’s email updates and direct mail. I rarely open my direct mail, but I will often open an email (both because I can’t stand the red alert bubble on my phone and) because I find that the subject lines are tailored to my shopping preferences, making me curious. In addition, the emails have social sharing buttons at the bottom. This feature is a great tactic for retailers utilizing email marketing since I can then pin new favorites to my Pinterest account with ease.

Email marketing is also important because email is a preferred channel of communication. ConstantContact states that 74 percent of online adults call it their preferred method of commercial contact. Not only is email marketing cheaper than direct mail, but consumers prefer it and it gets a much higher response rate of 20 to 30 percent of recipients opening email, compared to 1 to 2 percent of direct mail recipients.

The Guide to Email Marketing talks about how the technical words and right email persona can yield higher email opening rates. Combining a good subject line with the right email persona, consumers are more likely to open email than blank envelopes or everyday direct mail catalogues. Since most people view every email headline in their inbox, it’s hard for a catchy subject line to be overlooked. This SmartInsights article on IMC tells us that email is not dead; it is evolving and measurable. The article reinforces that not only is email is consistent and measurable, ‘it delivers better ROI than any other marketing tactic.’

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s